Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://imsear.hellis.org/handle/123456789/82084
Title: Pediatric parenteral nutrition in India.
Authors: Bhave, S
Bavdekar, A
Issue Date: 2-Nov-1999
Citation: Bhave S, Bavdekar A. Pediatric parenteral nutrition in India. Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 1999 ; 66(1 Suppl): S141-9
Abstract: Nutritional support to patients in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units is critical not only to minimize negative nitrogen balance but also to promote growth and development. Continuous technological and logistical advances in the Western countries have improved the efficacy and reduced the complications of parenteral nutrition (PN) to the extent that despite the constraints of cost and infrastructure, PN is now fast growing in India. Although widespread availability is very much desired, it is important that the technique is developed with considerable expertise and used judiciously with full knowledge of its indications, limitations, dangers and benefits. Indications for PN include surgical conditions (short gut syndrome), very low birth weight infants (particularly with necrotizing enterocolitis and surgical anomalies), malabsorption syndromes, conditions requiring bowel rest (acute pancreatitis, severe ulcerative colitis and necrotizing enterocolitis) and several non-gastrointestinal indications (end stage liver disease, renal failure, multiple trauma and extensive burns). Provision of PN is associated with significant and sometimes life threatening complications. The possible complications are technical (thrombosis, perforation of vein, thrombophlebitis), infections, metabolic disturbances, hepatobiliary stenosis, cholestasis, fibrosis, cirrhosis or cholelithiasis and bone related complications like osteopenia and fractures. Meticulous monitoring is necessary not only to detect complications but also to document clinical benefit.
Description: 36 references.
URI: http://imsear.hellis.org/handle/123456789/82084
Appears in Collections:Indian Journal of Pediatrics

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